What do the Scottish national No vote, erosion of Māori Party and Mana Party vote and transfer of all but one of the Māori electoral seats to Labour – despite this party’s trouncing in the New Zealand general elections – all have in common, in September 2014? – The decline of identity politics.

A product of more prosperous times, advocacy for difference no longer wins votes. More like, it rankles – as machines of uniformity roll forward. If voters are seeing any point at all, it is in greater unity of purpose.

People are far more interested in what they share in common: getting along in life with more job choice in a dynamic economy. Affordable housing is an elusive dream that all have incentive to chase – security rests nowhere else, it seems, nor even always there. This simple formula explains National’s thumping victory in the polls. Winners are emulated and adored, getting on with it; while whingers spin wheels and waste time.

‘Whining’ from special interest groups, that gained audience when progressive politics were affordable – before the 2008 credit crunch – now gains no truck. Merging with the materialist mass is where the action is, and “Parliament now has more Maori MPs than ever before” through abandonment of separate political development. *

If wages, conditions and living standards continue to decline under the re-elected government, opposing it will have to be on its own terms – a competitive vision of a stronger, greater unity.

If democracy itself is questioned for delivering inequitable outcomes, the answer is in building it forward – as an inclusive mechanism – and not retreating from it. For that is the tide of history.

‘Labour’ itself must review and take stock, as an abandoned identity – is it fit for the twenty-first century? The political centre, to which it moved, is still just as committed to labour for advancing. But it aspires to something more. – What could that cogent greater identity be, other than what we have?

This is the big question: What constructively defines Opposition, in New Zealand, as in Scotland, today?

Kia ora

* http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/auckland/news/628285561-more-maori-mps-than-ever-before
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_general_election,_2014

Māori sovereignty

Māori sovereignty


Māori sovereign-T

Māori sovereign-T

Scotland

Scotland

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